The Twelve Days of CrossFit

For the first round on Friday, the whiteboard said to do:
A hundred-yard sprint down the hall.
For the second round on Friday, the whiteboard said to do:
Two bearcrawlers and a hundred-yard sprint down the hall.
For the third round on Friday, the whiteboard said to do:
A three-second handstand, two bearcrawlers, and a hundred-yard sprint down the hall.
For the fourth round on Friday, the whiteboard said to do:
Four clean and jerks, three-second handstand, two bearcrawlers, and a hundred-yard sprint down the hall.
For the fifth round on Friday, the whiteboard said to do:
Fiiiiiive diving pushuuuups!
Four clean and jerks, three-second handstand, two bearcrawls, and a hundred-yard sprint down the hall.
For the sixth round on Friday, the whiteboard said to do:
Six knees to elbows, fiiiive diving pushuuups!
Four clean and jerks, three-second handstand, two bearcrawls, and a hundred-yard sprint down the hall.
For the seventh round on Friday, the whiteboard said to do:
Seven kettlebell swings, six knees to elbows, fiiiive diving pushuuups!
Four clean and jerks, three-second handstand, two bearcrawls, and a hundred-yard sprint down the hall.
For the eighth round on Friday, the whiteboard said to do:
Eight hanging leg-ups, seven kettlebell swings, six knees to elbows, fiiiive diving pushuuups!
Four clean and jerks, three-second handstand, two bearcrawls, and a hundred-yard sprint down the hall.
For the ninth round on Friday, the whiteboard said to do:
Nine assisted ring-dips, eight hanging leg-ups, seven kettlebell swings, six knees to elbows, fiiiive diving pushuuups!
Four clean and jerks, three-second handstand, two bearcrawls, and a hundred-yard sprint down the hall.
For the tenth round on Friday, the whiteboard said to do:
Ten easy squat-thrusts, nine assisted ring-dips, eight hanging leg-ups, seven kettlebell swings, six knees to elbows, fiiiive diving pushuuups!
Four clean and jerks, three-second handstand, two bearcrawls, and a hundred-yard sprint down the hall.
For the eleventh round on Friday, the whiteboard said to do:
Eleven assisted pullups, ten easy squat-thrusts, nine assisted ring-dips, eight hanging leg-ups, seven kettlebell swings, six knees to elbows, fiiiive diving pushuuups!
Four clean and jerks, three-second handstand, two bearcrawls, and a hundred-yard sprint down the hall.
For the twelfth round on Friday, the whiteboard said to do:
Twelve rocking pistols, eleven assisted pullups, ten easy squat-thrusts, nine assisted ring-dips, eight hanging leg-ups, seven kettlebell swings, six knees to elbows, fiiiive diving pushuuups!
Four clean and jerks, three-second handstand, two bearcrawls… and a hundred-yaa-aard sprint down the haaaallll.
It took me about 52 minutes. I was proud of getting through this one. If I’d known about this long workout in advance I might not have shown up. I’m glad I did, because it was the most fun I’ve ever had in a gym. I liked the repetition. It allowed me to see how much I could recover between sets of the same drill, and to practice using good form and technique when I was tired. I managed to focus on each moment to an extent I was really pleased with. The focus saved me from thinking ahead and psyching myself out about whatever insanity was coming next. With each round being longer than the previous one, it was good to avoid looking ahead.
The holiday party at the gym was last night too. Within about 30 minutes of everyone finishing the workout, people whisked out tables and decorations, plugged in strings of lights, and brought out all the potluck food and drinks. It was one of the best parties we’ve been to. What a friendly and interesting group of people. At the gym you just have no idea what you’ll learn when you ask somebody what they do or where they’re from. Several people have been in the military, which seems to create an interesting perspective on life as well as some interesting careers. We talked with someone who works in security and could tell us very little about what she does. Intriguing!
Other people we talked with are very knowledgeable about exercise, how to get strong, and how to avoid injury. I found myself digging for information about that. I’ve never had a knee or back injury and I’d like to think I can avoid them for life. But the more people I meet and talk with about active lifestyles, the more it starts to seem as if everyone but myself has had one or more knee surgeries.
I’ve learned that one of the riskiest moves for the knees is an uneven or off-balance landing. Gymnastics training articles warn coaches to make sure gymnasts complete any aerial twists before they land so that they don’t contact the ground while still rotating. People at the gym say to step down off the box-jump instead of jumping off; jump up, step down. I love working out with people who push hard, but the downside of that is the risk of injury when you’re tired and getting sloppy but still trying to push. I definitely reserve the right to tune out the “push” if I feel like I’m about to give out.
I also watch my balance and stability carefully when doing yard work on our sloped areas. They’re full of plants, dead leaves, and uneven stepping stones, besides being uneven to start with. I tiptoe up there and bend down, pull weeds, turn and toss them away, carry water buckets, or use tools, and then I turn around to step off the slope, over the edging logs, and onto the grass. In my daily life I think that’s the place where I’m most likely to fall and hurt myself if I’m not careful. Staying fit is an investment in my health for life, and I’d hate to sabotage that by developing a chronic problem or injury.

1 thought on “The Twelve Days of CrossFit”

  1. Okay, can you point me to somewhere that I could learn how to execute those 12 exercises? I mean, I understand what a handstand is, and I could probably find a site to tell me how to do them. But bearcrawlers? Pistolwhatevers? Hellllp. 🙂
    I’m so envious of your gym and workout colleagues.

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