Home Workout: Run 2 Miles

After trying the Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) for push-ups and sit-ups last Tuesday, I decided I ought to also take the two-mile run test. I don’t run regularly so I knew it would be hard to run two miles at all, let alone fast. Tom ran with me around the track at Garfield High School. We finished in 18:22, though I wanted to quit so bad! Eight times around the track seemed unimaginable after the first one. I just said to myself that there was no point in quitting because the only way to find out my time was to finish. (And then, unfortunately, the only way to improve my time would be to do it again and again… ugh!)
Still, according to the APFT calculator, my time was well under the 80% mark for a woman my age, and that makes me feel I did pretty well for a non-runner. I only need to improve my time by 1:22 (or 11 seconds per lap) to make the 100% mark. If I hadn’t had to stop and retie my shoes, maybe I would have come within 45 seconds of it.

Home Workout

I feel like a slug after being away all weekend and not working out since last Thursday. I’ve been reading this book about West Point, the U.S. Military Academy (Tom recommended it), and naturally I’m intrigued by their physical training and the basic test they use to evaluate the cadets’ condition. They have to run 2 miles as fast as possible, do their maximum sit-ups in 2 minutes (with someone holding their feet down), and do their maximum push-ups in 2 minutes to pass.
This site calculates a person’s required scores based on age and gender. For me, a 40-year-old female, a 100 percent score comprises 40 push-ups, 76 sit-ups, and 17 minutes for the run. My minimum acceptable score would be 13 push-ups, 38 sit-ups, and 22:42 on the run.
For a 20-year-old male cadet, 100 percent score requires 71 push-ups, 78 sit-ups, and 13 minutes on the run; minimum passing score is 42 push-ups, 53 sit-ups, and 15:54 on the run.
I know I couldn’t do well at the run right now, because I virtually never run. My idea of a running workout is to jog up a half-mile hill in the neighborhood, from Lake Washington Blvd. up to 29th Avenue. So I didn’t try the run today. I’ll take my little timer out to the high school track this weekend and try it.
In the meantime, my score today on the push-ups and sit-ups (drumroll): 43 push-ups; 60 sit-ups.
I also did some body-weight squats, 8 rounds of 20-second intervals with 10-second rests; 3 minutes upward-facing plank (shoulders on sofa, heels on footstool, rigid body in between)—had to rest at 1:21 and at :30 on that painful one; and 4 sets of 10 overhead squats with a broomstick, practicing for flexibility.

Home Workout

Three minutes of each, taking short breaks as needed:
Overhead squat (started out with 10-pound weights and switched after 15 to broomstick)
Pull-ups (couldn’t do any! Improvised with partial ones, negatives, hanging leg-raises, etc.)
Floor to ceiling (jumping as high as possible from a squat to hands overhead)
Push-ups (36)
Clean and jerk with 10-pound dumbbells (about 36)
Overhead squat (same as above—did 39)
Front squats, with or without 10-pound hand weights (51)
Overhead squat with broomstick (60)
A lot of the drills I do in at-home workouts are too easy because I don’t own heavier weights than 10 pounds. But drills like the overhead squat are challenging in that I’m struggling with a lack of back flexibility. I don’t know if it’s possible to regain that or not. Pull-ups are always hard, and today they were impossible—I guess because I was still fatigued from the Suffer on Saturday workout, strange as that seems.
I finally got a timer so I can do three-minute rounds. Maybe I’ll get some 20-pound dumbbells soon. But I don’t really like working out in the basement and I’ll probably never get myself to do it more than once a week in between visits to the gym.